Respecting international law: A practical argument

Respecting international law: A practical argument

Illustration by Shenuka Corea By Richard Falk, TFF Associate March 12, 2020 Prefatory Note International law – as so much else of value – has fallen on hard times, violated and ignored, where applicable and needed. Although this is a deplorable state of affairs as the planet burns and vulnerable people suffer from ecological hazards […]

Evasions, accidents, engagements, and fulfilment: An autobiographical fragment

Evasions, accidents, engagements, and fulfilment: An autobiographical fragment

By Richard Falk, TFF Associate March 16, 2020 Prefatory Note This post is something new for me, an autobiographical fragment written at the request of an online listserv as a suggestive model for academics at the start of their careers as diplomatic historians. I publish it here on my blog. It was found unsuitable for […]

Lies, the Bethlehem Doctrine, and the illegal murder of Soleimani

Lies, the Bethlehem Doctrine, and the illegal murder of Soleimani

By Craig Murray January 31, 2020 In one of the series of blatant lies the USA has told to justify the assassination of Soleimani, Mike Pompeo said that Soleimani was killed because he was planning “imminent attacks” on US citizens. It is a careful choice of word. Pompeo is specifically referring to the Bethlehem Doctrine of Pre-Emptive Self […]

Revisiting the Earth Charter

Revisiting the Earth Charter

By Richard Falk October 13, 2019 Prefatory Note: The following essay will appear as a chapter in Peter Burden & Klaus Bosselmann, eds., The Future of Global Ethics (Edward Elgar, 2018),  with the title: Revisiting the Earth Charter 20 Years Later: A Response to Ron Engel Ron Engel has articulated an insider review of the Earth […]

The law against aggression

The law against aggression

By Jonathan Power July 30, 2019 In 2010 the signatory states of the International Criminal Court, established to prosecute war crimes, convened a conference to add aggression to the list of crimes the court could try. (See the Rome Statute here, the relevant provisions and definitions of the concept of “aggression” are described in Article […]

Global Justice in the 21st Century

Global Justice in the 21st Century

By Richard Falk July 23, 2019 I make no claim to approach this book with an open mind. Making a fuller disclosure, I acknowledge with some pride that I have endorsed Justice for Some even before it was published, and my blurb appears on its back cover. Beyond this, two months ago I took part in […]

Remembering the World Court Advisory Opinion on Israel’s Separation Wall After 15 Years

Remembering the World Court Advisory Opinion on Israel’s Separation Wall After 15 Years

By Richard Falk July 20, 2019 On July 9, 2004 the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague issued an Advisory Opinion by a vote of 14-1, with the American judge the lone dissenter, as if there would have been any doubt about such identity even if not disclosed. The decision rendered in response […]

The US makes bad mistakes in the Persian Gulf

The US makes bad mistakes in the Persian Gulf

By Jonathan Power June 19, 2019 In 1980 in his State of the Union address President Jimmy Carter said: “Any attempt by any outside force to gain control of the Persian Gulf will be regarded as an assault on the vital interests of the United States and such an assault will be repelled by any […]

Saving the War Crimes Court

Saving the War Crimes Court

  By Jonathan Power  September 25, 2018 Last year the office of the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court released a report which for the first time explicitly named US military forces and CIA operatives in secret prisons as possible war crimes culprits for the alleged use of torture and rape. Because the American soldiers […]