The West portrays itself as a defender of human rights, but does it still have a right to moral leadership?

The West portrays itself as a defender of human rights, but does it still have a right to moral leadership?

The United States, Britain and European nations have a history of ‘weaponising’ human rights in foreign policy. Throughout late imperial history, China has rarely blamed other nations, their religion or race, for domestic problems. Martin PowersAn opinion piece in South China Morning PostMarch 4, 2021 The term “human rights” is properly a feature of the […]

Lord Macartney, China, and the convenient lies of history

Lord Macartney, China, and the convenient lies of history

James Carter February 25, 2020 In popular understanding, the Qianlong Emperor’s rejection of Lord Macartney and King George III was an act of hubris, a failure to recognize the military might of Britain and the West, the last prideful act of a waning empire before a “century of humiliation.” But what if our understanding is […]

The path to ending our global chaos is through the UN

The path to ending our global chaos is through the UN

February 15, 2021 By Mona Ali Khalil By all accounts, 2020 has been a terrible year so far — but is it worse than 1920? In 1920, World War I, which killed 16 million people, had just ended. The two-year influenza pandemic that followed killed 50 million more. In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic has already killed […]

Martin Luther King’s Warning of America’s Spiritual Death

Martin Luther King’s Warning of America’s Spiritual Death

Dr. Gary G. Kohls February 9, 2021 A half-century ago, The New York Times accused Martin Luther King Jr. of “slander” for decrying the Vietnam War and The Washington Post detected “unsupported fantasies” in his speech, recalled more favourably by Gary G. Kohls. Originally published on Jan. 19, 2014; slightly edited for the time element. […]

Memoir sketch: Championing lost causes

Memoir sketch: Championing lost causes

Richard Falk February 3, 2021 This article is a repost from TFF’s homepage, January 20, 2015 By chance I was reading César Vallejo’s poem, “Black Stone on a White Stone,” in a translation by Geoffrey Brock, and was struck by the opening stanza: I’ll die in Paris in the pouring rain a day I have […]

The Second Cold War is coming: It will be quite different from the one with the Soviet Union

The Second Cold War is coming: It will be quite different from the one with the Soviet Union

Cooperation would be much better for all, more desirable and perfectly possible. But some want confrontation. Roberto Savio February 2, 2020 It will be quite different from the Cold War with the Soviet Union… While the Coronavirus has rightly taken much of our attention, a fundamental geopolitical realignment has been taking shape in the world, […]

America’s defining problem in 2021 isn’t China: It’s America

America’s defining problem in 2021 isn’t China: It’s America

Credit: amagnawa1092/Shutterstock Andrew J. Bacevich February 1, 2020 A new essay casts doubt on the China threat as promulgated by our nation’s ruling elite. Writing in the journal Palladium, Richard Hanania has produced the first must-read essay of 2021. A research fellow at Columbia University’s Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, Hanania is part of an emerging […]

Why we love war

Why we love war

Albert Györgi’s sculpture, “Emptiness,” at Lake Geneva David R. Loy TFF Associate January 22, 2020 In war, there are no unwounded soldiers. —José Narosky War is hell, and today more than ever. Although high-tech weapons make it a videogame for some, those same weapons make it unbelievably destructive for everyone else. Whatever valor was once […]

Grand Illusions

Grand Illusions

Pankaj Mishra January 13, 2020 It’s time to abandon the intellectual narcissism of cold war Western liberalism. In Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation (2006), Jonathan Lear writes of the intellectual trauma of the Crow Indians. Forced to move in the mid-nineteenth century from a nomadic to a settled existence, they catastrophically lost not […]

Martin Luther King, Jr. and “The Year of Nonviolence or Nonexistence”

Martin Luther King, Jr. and “The Year of Nonviolence or Nonexistence”

Photo credit: Poster art courtesy paceebene.org John Dear January 20, 2021 It was early 1968. Since the previous spring Martin Luther King, Jr. had been pursuing a course that for many was unthinkable. He had deliberately connected the dots between the movement for civil rights and the struggle to end the war in Vietnam, and had paid the price. He was roundly criticized by the Johnson administration and the media, as well as […]

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